Indigenous Justice

CPJ has listened to our Indigenous sisters and brothers, and wishes to reiterate our steadfast intent to engage in reconciliation. We understand that engaging in true reconciliation must be an on-going process to transform Canadian values, social relations and even the dominant economic drivers. CPJ accepts this challenge.

In 2016, we undertook a study of all our program areas with a view to discerning how our work might more fully resound with the recommendations of the TRC, in the framework of the UNDRIP, and how our current efforts could enhance reconciliation efforts underway throughout Canadian society – especially among people of faith.

As people who believe in covenant relationships, we hold this promise to Indigenous Canadians as a sacred and on-going pledge.

Aurora in the Nunavut area

Climate Change in Canada’s North

This is the first feature in a series exploring the link between climate change and poverty. Canada’s North is an obvious example of the effects of climate change on not only the environment and natural resources, but also on the quality of life of those who live in the region. Stay tuned for Part II exploring the effects of poverty on Inuit in Canada.

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Implementing the UN DRIP

In November 2010, the Canadian government finally gave its formal endorsement of the United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples. And while Aboriginal groups and civil society greeted this move with enthusiasm, all were careful to say that the endorsement was not an end in and of itself, but rather a starting point. For the endorsement to have any meaning at all it must be implemented.

So what would this look like?

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Moving beyond “We’re sorry” to a legacy of change and hope

June 11 marks the second anniversary of the Canadian Government’s apology for the Indian Residential Schools. But an apology by itself is not enough. Forgiveness, reconciliation and the restoration of broken relationships requires a change in behaviour: repentance. In recent months, there have been more promises and actions to restore relations with Aboriginal peoples and the Government of Canada. But is it enough? Taking responsibility for the past can and should inspire significant and lasting change for the future –building a new legacy of change and hope.

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Aboriginal and church leaders herald Canada’s TRC

Aboriginals in Canada have long awaited the upcoming Truth and Reconciliation Commission on Indian residential schools in Canada. The TRC, heralded by leaders from Aboriginal groups and by church leaders, will be a rare collective space to talk, listen and heal. Ali Symons explores how people are getting more and more eager to begin this process, and describes the deep possibilities for healing and forgiveness to occur.

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Parliament of Canada

Unlikely but valuable guide to Aboriginal worldview

Jase Cowan’s review of Dancing With A Ghost: Exploring Aboriginal Reality by Rupert Ross.

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A warrior call for spiritual transformation

Jan Wesselius reviews Wasáse: Indigenous Pathways of Action and Freedom by Taiaiake Alfred.

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NATION TO NATION: Aboriginal Sovereignty and the Future of Canada

The new updated version of a 1992 edition. It includes 18 new articles and updates to 10 first-edition articles. Nearly 3,000 copies sold!

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Parliament of Canada

Walking with Elizabeth Penashue

An Innu elder goes to the land and tells her story on the way.

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