Indigenous Justice

CPJ has listened to our Indigenous sisters and brothers, and wishes to reiterate our steadfast intent to engage in reconciliation. We understand that engaging in true reconciliation must be an on-going process to transform Canadian values, social relations and even the dominant economic drivers. CPJ accepts this challenge.

In 2016, we undertook a study of all our program areas with a view to discerning how our work might more fully resound with the recommendations of the TRC, in the framework of the UNDRIP, and how our current efforts could enhance reconciliation efforts underway throughout Canadian society – especially among people of faith.

As people who believe in covenant relationships, we hold this promise to Indigenous Canadians as a sacred and on-going pledge.

CPJ writes to Trudeau in support of C-262, UNDRIP

CPJ writes to Trudeau in support of C-262, UNDRIP

December 2017

Read the Letter

CPJ wrote to Prime Minister Trudeau to commend his decision to support Bill C-262, a private member’s bill that will ensure the laws of Canada are in harmony with the United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples (UNDRIP). By supporting the adoption of Bill C-262 – and subsequently following up with implementation – the Government of Canada can fulfill its commitment to realize the calls to action of the Truth and Reconciliation Commission and “renew the relationship between Canada and Indigenous peoples.” In March 2016, CPJ issued a statement in compliance with the Truth and Reconciliation Commission’s Recommendation #48, stating our full support of UNDRIP.

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Book Review: Living on the Land

From the Catalyst, Summer 2017

Living on the Land: Indigenous Women’s Understanding of Place

Edited by Nathalie Kermoal and Isabel Altamirano-Jiménez

Athabasca University Press, 2016

Reviewed by Michelle Nieviadomy

Living on the Land is a beautiful and complex collection of perspective, story, knowledge, and wisdom. This book captures the traditional role, depth, and power of the Indigenous women from the Mohawk, Cree, Naskapi, Mayangna, Métis, and Inuit peoples. Not all Indigenous women come from the same narrative. And this book importantly gives each Indigenous woman a distinct voice on where she originates. Her story is meaningful as it is a bridge of knowledge from the ancestral way of being to the modern world in which she lives.

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Towards Reconciliation and Climate Justice

Towards Reconciliation and Climate Justice

There are many things Canada needs to do in order to truly move forward in reconciliation, but one vital piece is acknowledging the right and connection to land.

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AGM 2017: Reconciliation Needs Problem Solvers

At CPJ’s Annual General Meeting in Winnipeg, Shaun Loney delivered a keynote address on the real essence of reconciliation in Canadian society. Loney’s book, An Army of Problem Solvers, provides deep insights into the connections between reconciliation and economic prosperity in Indigenous communities.

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Pikangikum

An Ice Road to Reconciliation

From the Catalyst, Spring 2017

Climate change affects the lives, lands, and cultural heritage of Indigenous peoples more directly and dramatically than most Canadians. But many communities in the more isolated and northern regions go unseen and unheard. Climate justice is a part of reconciliation with Indigenous peoples.

One road to get us there may well be made of ice and serve a small Ojibway Nation in northwestern Ontario.

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On Canada’s 150th What Are First Nations Kids Losing Out To?

On Canada 150, What Are First Nations Kids Losing Out To?

By Jennifer King & Cindy Blackstock on March 23, 2017

From the Catalyst, Spring 2017

As the federal government prepares to spend half a billion dollars to celebrate Canada’s 150th birthday, First Nations in northern Ontario are mourning the loss of three young girls to suicide. These tragedies could have been prevented if Canada provided equitable mental health and other children’s services on reserve.

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Parliament of Canada

Education is Critical to Reconciliation

From The Catalyst, Summer 2016

It’s been just over a year since the Truth and Reconciliation Commission of Canada (TRC) published its 94 calls to action. They appeal to all sectors of society to change, to improve, and to educate. The Commission calls on us to reconcile with this nations’ Indigenous Peoples so as to avoid repeating history.

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Ski With the Cree

Ski With the Cree

From The Catalyst, Summer 2016
By Katherine Walsh

Fifteen of us from Montreal were on a “ski with the Cree” trip arranged by Kim Cheechoo, the Tourism Officer for the Moose Cree First Nation, and Bill Pollack, an 80-year-old forester and our intrepid organizer.

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Parliament of Canada

Living the 8th Fire

by Danielle Rowaan 

“When you hear about all the assimilation policies one after the other, you sit back and think ‘whoa,’” says Shannon Perez.  Shannon has experienced and led the Blanket Exercise, an interactive workshop developed by KAIROS that walks participants through the history of Canada from the perspective of Indigenous peoples, dozens of times.

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Statement from CPJ on TRC Calls to Action

March 2016
Read the Statement
In June of 2015, the Truth and Reconciliation Commission of Canada (TRC) released 94 Calls to Action to guide us towards a repaired relationship between Indigenous and non-Indigenous peoples and a more just and equitable future. CPJ has released a statement in response to the TRC’s Call to Action #48 and has also endorsed the KAIROS Education for Reconciliation campaign in support of the TRC’s Call to Action #62.i.

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