Research: Poverty in Canada

Every October, CPJ releases our annual report on poverty in Canada, Poverty Trends. These reports highlight the unequal effects of poverty on racialized people, single-parent families, single seniors and adults, children, persons with disabilities, and Indigenous peoples. We also report on poverty rates of provinces, territories, and communities across Canada. Using the latest data from Statistics Canada and research reports by advocacy groups across the country, Poverty Trends provides us with a snapshot of poverty in Canada from year to year. We maintain that poverty is a violation of people’s inherent rights and dignity and that the Government of Canada has a legal and moral obligation to take action to end poverty and inequity. In Poverty Trends 2021 we build on the 2020 report's intersectional analysis of people's rights and realities in Canada. Canada follows persistent and predictable trends in terms of who is most likely to be poor, and what impact poverty is likely to have on people and communities. These trends have been exacerbated by the Covid-19 pandemic as those living in poverty and precarity were disproportionately affected by inadequate access to healthcare, food insecurity, and inadequate housing.  This report explores why these inequitable trends in poverty persist, and what fundamental changes are needed to rehabilitate our socioeconomic “ecosystem” so that all people’s rights and dignity are honoured. Taking a narrative approach, Poverty Trends 2021 gives us a current overview of poverty in Canada, highlighting both promising tools and problematic inequities in many poverty reduction efforts so far.
The Burden of Poverty

The Burden of Poverty

“The Burden of Poverty: A snapshot of poverty across Canada” uses the most recent data from Statistics Canada to demonstrate the reality of poverty across the country.

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Making Ends Meet

This fourth and final report in our Poverty Trends Scorecard series shows that in the face of economic uncertainty and stagnant incomes, Canadians are working hard to keep up with rising living costs.

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Infographic: Guaranteed Livable Income in Canada

CPJ’s infographic comparing Canada’s current welfare system to a Guaranteed Livable Income.

 

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Mother and child

Is it time for a Guaranteed Livable Income?

Call it what you want – a basic income, guaranteed annual income, or guaranteed livable income – it’s an idea that’s gaining momentum both in Canada and abroad as countries such as Switzerland, India, and Brazil begin to test and consider such a program.

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Poverty Trends Highlights 2013

“Poverty Trends Highlights: Canada 2013”

October 2013
The new “Poverty Trends Highlights” report brings together the most recent data on poverty in Canada to identify where things are improving and where they’re getting worse.

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“Labour Market Trends”

July 2013
The new “Labour Market Trends” is an in-depth look at the Canadian labour market in the aftermath of the global financial crisis, and who continues to be most impacted.

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Poverty Trends Highlights 2013

“Income, Wealth, and Inequality”

February 2013
The “Income, Wealth, and Inequality” report is an in-depth look at a range of topics including income trends, the impact of inequality, and  the growing concentration of wealth.

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Housing Infographic

Infographic: Affordable housing in Canada

CPJ’s infographic on affordable housing in Canada.

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Homeless young man living on the street

Poverty Trends Scorecard: Canada 2012

October 2012
The first report in CPJ’s Poverty Trends Scorecard series examines the impact of poverty on people across Canada and shows that while some progress toward ending poverty in Canada has been made, but much more work remains for us all to do.

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Quality Care, Quality Choices: Backgrounder & position paper

May 2010
Rooted in issues of early childhood development, gender equality, and poverty, the lack of a national childcare plan is having detrimental effects on many children and their families in Canada. It is clear that what is needed is an affordable, accessible, quality national childcare program based on the best interest of the child. It is crucial that this program be situated within the context of a comprehensive set of family-oriented policies.

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