Stephen Kaduuli

Stephen is the Refugee Rights Policy Analyst at CPJ. He has worked as a civil servant, forced migration researcher and in the not for profit sector. Stephen has a Masters in Demography from the Australian National University; a BA in Social Work from Makerere University and a Diploma in Paralegal studies from Herzing College Toronto. He also has certificates in refugee and forced migration studies from Oxford and York universities. Stephen is very passionate about public justice and has written and published research papers pertaining to public justice issues including refugee and forced migration issues, governance and poverty reduction.

Posted by Stephen Kaduuli

Canada has a moral obligation to accept climate migrants

Despite our small population, Canada has had an outsized impact on the climate crisis. Now we have a moral imperative to welcome those displaced by climate change.

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Letter to Minister Mendicino: Improve Refugee Integration

CPJ and the CRC for Public Dialogue called on the IRCC minister to address several lingering concerns that would help refugees to fully integrate into Canadian society for the good of all.

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Show Love to the Stranger this Christmas

As Christmas approaches and we mull over its holy significance, it is important to remember that there are 71 million displaced persons of whom 26 million are refugees.

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The Canadian Racial Reality

People of color and Indigenous peoples in Canada continue to face systematic racism. However, there has been a relative absence of any meaningful conversation about the issue during this election.

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Legal aid ping pong harms vulnerable refugee claimants

In its spring budget, the Ontario government cut Legal Aid Ontario (LAO) funding by $133 million and said it will no longer provide provincial funds for refugee and immigration cases. LAO is mandated to promote access to justice for refugee claimants among other vulnerable Ontarians. The cuts would mean that claimants would have been denied…

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Access to justice in the refugee context

Access to justice, particularly for the most vulnerable persons in society, is a key issue in policy debates in Canada. Refugees are persons who have fled from traumatizing circumstances and need the legal system to facilitate the establishment of their refugee claims. Photo by witwiccan is licensed under CC BY-NC-SA

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New Asylum Restrictions at the U.S.- Mexico Border

The Trump administration announced new immigration rules ending asylum protections for almost all migrants who arrive at the US-Mexico border. The changes are likely to have a domino effect on Canada with which the US signed the Safe Third Country Agreement (STCA) in 2004. It is time for Canada, as a world leader in refugee rights protection, to end the STCA.

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Slaves in Libya

Thousands of black Africans are fleeing armed conflict, persecution or severe economic hardship hoping to reach Europe for better lives. Their journey usually begins with a trek through deserts to Libya. Then, they proceed for the Mediterranean Sea on unseaworthy boats to Europe. However, many of them end up in overcrowded detention centers, run by smugglers, where they are traded as slaves.

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Debunking refugee myths

Refugee rights are one of five main themes addressed by Citizens for Public Justice (CPJ), “a national organization of members inspired by faith to act for justice in Canadian public policy.

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Survey on Canadian attitudes towards immigration riddled with flaws

This week, CBC News released results of their pre-election online survey, in which the opinions of 4,500 Canadians were sought out. The most notable findings of the survey were that 76 per cent of the respondents agreed that Canada should do more to encourage skilled labourers (through the immigration system’s economic stream) to immigrate to the…

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Reflecting on Refugee Rights on World Refugee Day

World Refugee Day is marked internationally on June 20 annually. This is an occasion to educate the public about refugee issues and to mobilize political will and resources to address problems and celebrate achievements thus far.

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Words do Matter in the Refugee Debate

Over the past decade, refugees have been called all sorts of names in Canada. Refugees have been labeled: “queue jumpers,” “asylum shoppers,” “illegal immigrants,” “economic migrants,” and “illegal border crossers.”. To mention “illegal” when describing refugees is to paint them with criminality. To call them “asylum shoppers” implies that they are economic migrants and not genuine refugees. When a minister labels refugees with such denigrating names, it makes the populists think that they have allies in government.

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