Brad Wassink

​Asha has been interested in environmental and social issues for many years, but became especially interested in the places in which the two areas intersect early in her university career. While doing her B.A. in Environmental Studies with a minor in Justice Studies at the University of Regina she found that the two issues were strongly connected inciting a passion for ecological and climate justice issues. This led her to get more involved in addressing these issues in her community including joining the Board of Directors of the university’s on-campus environmental and social justice non-profit organization. Raised and active in the Anglican Church, Asha became involved with the Anglican Church of Canada’s relief and development organization, the Primate’s World Relief and Development Fund (PWRDF), in 2014. Through her volunteer work with PWRDF she seeks to live out the commandment to “love thy neighbor” with a global reach by sitting on the organization’s Youth Council and Board of Directors. Having lived in many parts of Canada growing up, Asha is pleased to be living in the nation’s capital and working to influence positive change around national ecological justice issues.

Posted by Brad Wassink

7 Ways Youth Can Reduce Their Ecological Footprints

Climate change is an urgent issue that requires immediate action. Life as we know it is not sustainable at the current rate of greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. GHGs are released into the atmosphere by human activities, such as transportation, farming, use of electronics. Climate scientists have produced significant research demonstrating the risks of rising emissions and concerned citizens are doing their best to encourage action. Now, it is up to us to make a difference. We must reduce our personal emissions and press the government to ensure that larger emitters do the same!

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Book Review: An Army of Problem Solvers

From the Catalyst, Summer 2017

An Army of Problem Solvers: Reconciliation and the Solutions Economy

By Shaun Loney

McNally Robinson, 2016

Reviewed by Asha Kerr-Wilson

An Army of Problem Solvers is about empowering people to be the problem solvers of the big social, economic, and environmental problems faced by their communities. Shaun Loney is a social entrepreneur and former civil servant who has worked with and been involved in establishing a number of social enterprises – small-scale community non-profits that aim to address social or environmental challenges using market forces

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Towards Reconciliation and Climate Justice

Towards Reconciliation and Climate Justice

There are many things Canada needs to do in order to truly move forward in reconciliation, but one vital piece is acknowledging the right and connection to land.

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Making the Links: Refugees, Climate change, and Poverty

Making the Links: Refugees, Climate Change, and Poverty

By Asha Kerr-Wilson and Bolu Coker

When we think of the Syrian refugee crisis, political unrest and terrorism immediately come to mind. Very rarely do we ever think of climate change and poverty as casual factors in this crisis, or in our current global refugee situation. It’s not an obvious connection many of us have made.  A closer look at these links is necessary to ensure we can address the ever-evolving conflict situations of our times.

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Pikangikum

An Ice Road to Reconciliation

From the Catalyst, Spring 2017

Climate change affects the lives, lands, and cultural heritage of Indigenous peoples more directly and dramatically than most Canadians. But many communities in the more isolated and northern regions go unseen and unheard. Climate justice is a part of reconciliation with Indigenous peoples.

One road to get us there may well be made of ice and serve a small Ojibway Nation in northwestern Ontario.

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9 ways to reduce your GHG footprint

Identifying specific Canadian GHG emission sources and what they contribute to Canada’s GHG footprint helps us understand the need for climate action across sectors. And knowing which of your daily choices produce GHG emissions is the first step in making climate-friendly habit changes (see What is a tonne of greenhouse gas emissions?). Once you have this information, the question becomes, how can you use it to reduce the impact and help drive Canada towards ambitious emissions reductions?

Here are some suggestions for how you can contribute to the reduction of Canada’s GHG footprint in nine key emitting areas.

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