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All together now – references

References: CPJ Submission Pre-Budget Consultation 2018

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Book Review: Maximum Canada

 From the Catalyst, Summer 2018

Maximum Canada: Why 35 Million Canadians Are Not Enough Hardcover

By Doug Saunders

Knopf Canada, 2017

Reviewed by Gloria Nafziger

I was fascinated by Doug Sunders’ recent book Maximum Canada. Like many Canadians, I support immigration to Canada, believe that multiculturalism is a good thing, and think we need new immigrants to help sustain our economy, particularly as our current birth rate will not support the needs of an aging population.

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Book Review: Turning Parliament Inside Out

 From the Catalyst, Summer 2018

Turning Parliament Inside Out: Practical Ideas for Reforming Canada’s Democracy

Edited by Michael Chong, Scott Simms, and Kennedy Stewart

Douglas & McIntyre, 2017

Reviewed by John Milloy 

Turning Parliament Inside Out is an attempt by a multi-party group of backbench Members of Parliament to identify ways to reform Parliament. In a series of well-written and accessible essays, these concerned MPs outline practical solutions for increasing the quality of debate, making Parliament more representative and curbing the power of party leaders and their staff. 

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Get updates by subscribing to JusticE-News, CPJ’s e-newsletter Subscribe Read more articles Tweets by publicjustice Faith | Justice | Politics

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CPJ’s New Board Members

CPJ is excited to welcome four new Board members. As our Board, staff, and supporters gathered in Toronto, CPJ elected Rene Adams, Harold Roscher, Cherilyn Spraakman, and Tiffany Talen. We are excited about the contributions they will bring to our work! Read on to learn more about these new additions to CPJ’s Board of Directors.

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Mobilizing Young Adults for Social Action

Mobilizing Young Adults for Social Action

Young adults often get a bad rap. If they aren’t failing to launch, they are too addicted to their “likes,” unreliable, and unengaged. Besides for a few small caveats, I couldn’t  disagree more.

But young adults really care, and when given the proper space, place, and some tools, they exercise incredible levels of ingenuity and creativity to raise awareness among their peers and take action in their communities.

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Our Journeys to Justice

Are church communities the best places to go if you want to engage in social and ecological justice? Is the prophetic desire for justice encouraged to burn in the hearts of church-goers today? Do our ecclesial structures promote animation and action towards public justice?

A new book by Citizens for Public Justice, Journeys to Justice: Reflections on Canadian Christian Activism, answers these questions head on.

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A Prayer for International Women's Day

A Prayer for International Women’s Day

International Women’s Day is both a celebration of women and our successes in achieving women’s equality and a reminder of the challenges that we still face.

This prayer from the Sisters of Mercy is a reminder of the many roles that women play, as well as a call to honour those roles. It is an adaptation of Miriam Therese Winter’s “Valiant Women” by Cathy O’Keefe, a graduate of Mercy High School in Baltimore, Maryland.

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the Catalyst, Winter 2017

the Catalyst, Winter 2017

The Winter 2017 edition of the Catalyst includes updates on our fall Chew on This! campaign as well as articles on the UN climate conference (COP23), tax reform, and the Safe Third Country Agreement.

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Parliament of Canada

Book Review: Hopeful Realism in Urban Ministry

From the Catalyst, Summer 2017

Hopeful Realism in Urban Ministry: Critical Explorations and Constructive Affirmations of Hoping Justice Prayerfully

By Barry K. Morris

Wipf & Stock Publishers, 2016

Reviewed by Lee Hollaar

To all involved in any seemingly overwhelming ministry, this is an important and refreshing read. While dealing with issues of poverty, marginalization, and the politics of exclusion, it’s easy to move beyond naive optimism and approach a sense of futility. While the author looks through the lens of ministry in urban settings, this book speaks with equal cogency to the work of social justice—and any ministry, for that matter.

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